Introduction to Pinsec

Due to its location, Pinsec is the only village in the valley that went through the twentieth century without experiencing significant changes.

Map of Pinsec

Built on a ridge surrounded by steep valleys, it was built in this way in order to protect homes from avalanches. The village is steep, so much so that “we must even put shoes on the chickens.” But the villagers are brave, that’s why they say : “Even if we have to give up, we don’t give up” which means : “Never give up”.

The village’s name refers to the surrounding pine forests.

In 1950 Pinsec had about a hundred and fifty inhabitants, as many cows, eighty goats, a flock of forty sheep, ten mules, pigs and chickens. Formerly, when a non-Anniviard came to the village, residents would stare out the window at them; Now they look closely when a cow passes by...

Until 1975, a shop was run by a women, mother of a large family, and appreciated by all. We remember the day she said : “I can close, they have all come through.” In the 1950s, the family took care of the only telephone in the village.

In 1979, the”Rose de Pinsec” was filmed by Jacques Thévoz. This film recounts the life of the past, the pace of the work, following in the footsteps of Rose Monnet. “Rose, the Anniviers “ant”, this prodigious craftswoman (...) cutting hay like a man, better than a man.“

In 1985, Bernard Savioz from Pinsec published a book, “ Valaisans descendants d’Attila “ (Ed. La Matze, Sion, 1985), where he drew parallels between Hungarians and Anniviards, referring to older sources (Bourrit in 1781,Desor, and Fischer). Huns who fled after the defeat of Attila (451 AD) to Italy, might have lived in Anniviers. This explains why Hungarians come to Anniviers looking for clues proving their common origins.

Today in Pinsec, there are thirty persons domiciled year-round. During Christmas, Carnival and Easter, one hundred and fifty persons occupy secondary residences.